The Link Between Your Weight and Your Hormones

Weight gain isn’t just an issue associated with the food you eat or how much you exercise. It can also be affected by your hormones — and vice versa. If you’ve noticed that you’re experiencing hormonal changes and/or weight fluctuations, it might help you to discuss these issues with your doctor.

Drs. Daniel McDonald and Marc Wilson, as well as the rest of our team at OB/GYN Specialists, want you to feel comfortable and confident in your body. One of the best ways to get there is to understand how your body works, especially how many of its functions, which may seem independent of one another, are actually linked.

The link between your weight and your hormones

Many times, a person’s weight loss or gain is immediately chalked up to a change in diet or exercise habits. If you notice you might have gained a few pounds, you might become frustrated with yourself and start exercising more. 

Conversely, if the scale says you’re lighter than normal, you might congratulate yourself for eating better. Often, however, larger weight fluctuations are due to a hormonal change or imbalance, which is something many people don’t even think about.

According to studies, hormonal changes can influence your appetite, including how much you eat and what you’re craving. They can also even cause you to store more or less fat in your body, depending on their balance. 

As such, simply saying one must “exercise and eat right” isn’t always enough to create a real difference in your life, especially if your hormones are involved in your weight loss or gain.

Hormones that affect your weight

A large number of hormones important to your body can significantly affect your weight. It can help to talk to your doctor about your weight concerns and to find out if, perhaps, your hormone levels may be imbalanced enough to lead to the problem. Below, you’ll find some of the most common hormones that can cause weight fluctuations.  

Insulin

Insulin is the hormone that tells your body to store fat. Sometimes, your insulin stores can spike, even if you’re not battling diabetes. Avoiding sugary foods and not overeating are great ways to help keep your insulin in check. You can also eat more protein and drink green tea to achieve similar effects.

Leptin

Leptin is the hormone that makes you feel full. Unfortunately, those who are already obese sometimes experience problems with leptin not working the way it should. This can make it hard to lose weight, even if you’re doing what your doctor tells you, such as eating right and exercising. 

Ways you can improve your body’s leptin sensitivity are to avoid inflammatory foods, eat more fatty fish, and sleep at least seven hours a night.

Cortisol

Cortisol is often known as your stress hormone because it’s released when your body is under stress. If your cortisol levels are chronically high, it can be hard to minimize overeating habits. Even those who are able to avoid this issue may still have trouble losing weight. 

To bring cortisol levels down, it’s important to practice mindfulness, avoid stress, eat a balanced diet that does not involve cutting calories in an extreme way, and sleep at least seven hours a night.

Estrogen

Estrogen, the female sex hormone, can cause weight gain whether it’s extremely high or extremely low. Some ways to manage your estrogen are to get plenty of fiber in your diet, eat more cruciferous vegetables, exercise more frequently, and add flaxseeds to your diet.

Hormonal imbalances you can’t control 

Again, even if you’re doing everything right and utilizing these tips to try to keep your hormones in balance, you may still require some help from your doctor. 

Checking your hormone levels in order to find out which of these are higher or lower and which may require more balance can help. This way, you will know what is creating your weight gain or loss and how you can better manage the issue at home and with your doctor’s help. 

Want to learn more about your weight and hormones?

To make an appointment with Drs. McDonald or Wilson at OB/GYN Specialists, call 940-202-0566 today. You can also send us a message here on our website.

Our Denton, Texas, office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30am to 5pm to offer our patients the chance to ask questions, get informed, and start living the lives they most desire.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Telltale Symptoms of Menopause

If you’re a woman in your 40s, you might be wondering about, and dreading, the start of menopause. From hot flashes and night sweats to mood swings, insomnia, and others, learn more about the telltale symptoms of menopause — and when it might start.

Bleeding Between Periods: Is it Cause for Alarm?

Light bleeding between periods is something most women experience at one time or another. But is it normal? It’s not always a sign of something more serious, but if it’s accompanied by pain, fever, or other symptoms, it’s time to visit the doctor.

4 Ways to Lower Your Risk for STDs

If you’re sexually active, you’re at risk for contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). STDs are common, but you can take several precautions to reduce your risk and maintain your health. Learn how to practice safe sex.

How Does Endometriosis Affect Moods?

Endometriosis is characterized by painful, heavy periods. But did you know that not all of the symptoms of endometriosis are physical? Chronic pain and associated stress, along with hormonal imbalance, could cause mood swings, depression, and more.

Diabetes and Pregnancy: What to Expect

Millions of American women have diabetes. It’s a common metabolic condition that can make a pregnancy high-risk, but knowing how it affects your body can help you maintain your health and enjoy a full-term pregnancy. Learn what to look out for.

Menstrual Pain and Bleeding: How Much is Normal?

Most women have monthly periods. Symptoms range from irritability to bloating to cramps, but how do you know if your symptoms are more severe than normal? Learn the indications of heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain and how to get treatment.