Thanks to Robotic Surgery, Hysterectomies Have Come a Long Way

robotic hysterectomy, OB/GYN Specialists

There are many reasons your provider here at OB/GYN Specialists may recommend a hysterectomy. A few of them include:

Regardless of the reason, you may well have some concerns about having surgery. One solution that may be right for you is robotic surgery.

What is a robotic hysterectomy?

Traditionally, hysterectomies were performed through an incision in your abdomen. Today, this type of surgery is called an abdominal hysterectomy, and it’s still appropriate in some situations.

In many cases, though, a laparoscopic or robotic procedure is a better alternative. Laparoscopic surgery is done through small incisions, using a long, thin tube that has a camera and light attached. Your surgeon performs the surgery using specialized instruments.

There are a few advantages to having a robotic hysterectomy. Laparoscopy is considered a minimally invasive surgery, and thanks to the smaller incision, there’s less risk of infection than with a larger incision.

Also, the smaller incision means you’ll probably heal much faster. Abdominal hysterectomies require 6-8 weeks for recovery, in large part because the muscles of your abdomen have to heal where they were cut. In a robotic hysterectomy, there’s less trauma to the surrounding tissues from the surgery.

Different types of robotic hysterectomy

Depending on your condition and the reasons for your hysterectomy, your doctor may recommend one of several types:

Your ovaries and fallopian tubes may or may not be removed regardless of which type of hysterectomy you have.

One of the greatest advantages of having a robotic hysterectomy is the shortened recovery time. However, you’ll still need time to heal. You’ll probably only have to stay in the hospital one night.

After that you’ll likely experience some vaginal bleeding for a few days. You should get plenty of rest, avoid lifting, and follow postop instructions, as well as monitor yourself for signs of infection.

Our staff will give you specific instructions regarding when you should resume normal activity and sexual intercourse.

Permanent changes

Having a hysterectomy is a major change, but oftentimes means less pain and better quality of life going forward.

It’s possible that you’ll experience some of the following changes:

It’s important to discuss these changes with your care provider here at OB/GYN Specialists. We’re working toward the best possible outcome for you, and we have experience in dealing with the changes that may accompany a hysterectomy.

 

If you’d like to learn more about robotic hysterectomy and whether you may be a candidate, call our office in Denton, Texas, to make an appointment.

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