5 Common Myths About Infertility

If you have problems with fertility, you actually aren’t alone. Over 5 million people who are of child-bearing age, that’s one in 10 couples, have trouble conceiving. When it comes to fertility, the advice that we’re given is often fairly unhelpful. 

At OB/GYN Specialists, we want to make sure that you’re well-informed about all aspects of your reproductive health. So, we’ve compiled this helpful guide so that you can separate fact from fiction when it comes to your fertility troubles. 

Myth 1: Fertility is only a woman’s problem.

It’s most commonly thought that infertility is a woman’s problem, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, although 35% of fertility cases are due to women having problems, an even number of those cases, also 35%, are caused by men. There are a number of symptoms in men that can suggest infertility, like testicle pain or swelling, changes in desire, problems with maintaining an erection or ejaculating, and small, firm testicles. Additionally, men’s infertility increases with age, just like women’s.  

Myth 2: It’s all in your head.

You’ve probably heard that if you just stop worrying, then you’ll get pregnant or that the problem is all in your head. However, in reality, infertility isn’t a psychological problem or an issue with not just relaxing enough. Infertility is actually a problem with the reproductive system. Although it can help to relax or destress, doing so won’t solve your fertility problems. 

Myth 3: Health doesn’t influence fertility.

Did you know that one of the largest factors of infertility, for both men and women, lies in health problems. For your best chances at conception, you’ll want to live a healthy lifestyle, which includes things like maintaining a healthy weight, taking multivitamins, refraining from drugs and alcohol, and cutting back on smoking. 

Myth 4: Having a child means you don’t have to worry.

According to data, about 30% of infertility cases happen after a couple has had their first child. So, even if you already have a child, you can still experience infertility when trying to have a second or third child. 

Myth 5: If you work hard enough, you’ll get pregnant. 

Infertility is a medical condition, so it isn’t your fault that you can’t conceive. Sometimes your infertility problems will remain untreatable, no matter how hard you work to solve them. However, there are a lot of new advances in medicine that can help you conceive. According to The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, over half of all couples who pursue infertility treatments are able to have a successful pregnancy. So, there is hope yet!

Learn more about all of your options when it comes to infertility. You can have a successful pregnancy. Call us to make an appointment today.           

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